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Missing link in dream and reality

"I desire things that will destroy me in the end" -- Sylvia Plath

While looking out of my balcony, I can always spot a single star in the sky. Probably with the pollution level in Bangalore , the dim ones are hard to spot. If it was southern sky, I could bet it was Sirius. But I don't know what direction it is in and I am too lazy to make any efforts to find out. Moreover the name of the star does not matter. However, it has a similar symbolic significance for me as green light had Fitzgerald's Gatsby. A dream well conceived , clearly visualised and yet beyond grasp. A dream thoroughly cherished and yet unattained.

This brings me to another haunting question. How do people start dreaming whatever they start dreaming about? Frankly, it's Gatsby who comes to rescue. Gatsby's dream incidentally was a outcome of exposure to the girl( I wish I remembered her but I don't even care about finding right now) .   We can't dream of things we cannot envisage. I think our consciousness is shaped by is shaped by the temporal and  physical( probably sometimes mathematical) exposure. A poor can never unless he has experienced the rift that exists . We can't desire  things that we are completely unaware of.

But the story  does not really end with desiring things. Most of us want something or the other. Content is a fictional state , at most an unstable state where no one can stay forever. But even though we all aspire for greater goals why do only handful of people chase them.  Is it fear, ignorance, cynicism or confusion that impede us from pursuing our goals. What incites passion ? I have no clue. The    ardent desire to undertake an arduous task to achieve what is aspired is missing in most of us. Why aren't we passionate about things is something that confounds me.

I can't explain why most of us don't have it. But I inkling of how those who have it build it. I think it's a conscious choice which due to the the perfect balance of challenge that it poses and gratification that it offers becomes a deeply ingrained habit. I think I have thrown a few words there but I believe that people who have ever thought about it deeply could clearly understand it.

If I ever get to write to again, I will probably elaborate on that. But for now I will let you mull over it.

Comments

  1. These village and bedouin shaykhs in central and southern jordans not only played important roles in local land matters but in regional divisions of land as well. Several important regional divisions of land occurcd in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. The 4 Ad wan divided up their lands among their constituent sections ca. 1760T Around the same time the ‘Adwan,The New Jordans, the Abbad, and the settled families of al-Salt divided up the western part of al-Balqa' into what eventually became several dozen villages. The various sec-dons of the Bam Sakhr also divided up their vast holdings among themselves.

    The early 19th century was thus a time in which local social control, through settled and bedouin family groupings headed by shaykhs, exerted control over land. Formal government control was non-existent,Cheap Jordans, and while individually-controlled land did exist,jordan releases, family control of this resource was paramount. The coming of the new Ottoman age was to affect this situation in several profound ways.

    The reasons why the Ottoman empire decided to reimpose its direct control over the jordansian regions are familiar and a detailed study of them lies outside the scope of this study. In brief,Retro Jordans, the loss of the empire’s control over its outlying provinces combined with the political, military,Jordans Shoes, and economic intrusion of the West into the Middle East prompted the long series of Ottoman “reforms” that stretched from the late 18th century through the period of the Tan-zimat (1839-1876) and into the late 19th century. As part of these reforms, the central government moved to reassert its authority throughout the empire. It accomplished this by curbing the independence of local rulers throughout the empire (and especially outlying regions like jordans), rcimposing a new, more Western-style Ottoman bureaucratic and military presence, and extracting taxes to finance the creation of a Western-style military and bureaucracy. The relatively late move of the Ottomans into the jordansian region starting in 1851 also served to shore up the central government’s control over the important hajj route, which expanded beyond religious importance alone when the Ottomans erected telegraph lines in the area in the late 19th century and later connected Damascus and Medina by rail in the first decade of the 20th century.

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